Parkview Adventist Medical Center – Hospital in Brunswick, Maine
September 18th, 2014

PARKVIEW PATIENT PORTAL

It’s easy to use and allows you to stay informed, in touch and in good health by linking you directly to your own health information.

The MyHealthView Patient and Consumer Health Portal is Parkview’s opportunity to bring convenience to you…it’s only a click away!

Sign up today for portal access; enrollment really is easy!

Here are the easy steps to accessing the Parkview Portal:

1.     Provide your email when you register for your visit at Parkview.

2.     Access your email for your one-time user name, password and link to the Portal.

3.     Click on the link to access the Portal.

4.     Enter your one-time user name, password, and security question and click “Log on”.

5.     Enter your new user name and password.

6.     Explore the Portal!

You can use the Parkview Portal from anywhere using a browser; you can also access the Portal from your smartphone or tablet.

The Parkview Patient Portal allows YOU to manage your information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without waiting. 

 Patient Portal Message

Also, the  Portal allows you to connect with your providers!  Simply click the message sign (as seen above), and you can exchange messages with your provider between visits.

Here is the list of providers who currently receive patient notes from the Parkview Patient Portal:

Brunswick Primary Care office:

Dr. Jeffrey Maher, Dr. Cortney Linville, Dr. Melanie Rand, Dr. Lawrence Losey.  And Nurse Practitioners Hallie Prince and Kathryn Thorson.

Brunswick Cardiology:

Dr. Nicholas Laffley, Dr. Patrick Lawrence

September 11th, 2014
Parkview is proud to congratulate the Outpatient Services Team at Parkview Adventist Medical Center for their efforts in helping our healthcare system receive National recognition as Avatar Patient Experience Award Winners in the medium-sized hospital category. In addition, Parkview   achieved the HCAHPS Best Performer “Overall Rating”, HCAHPS Best Performer, “Willingness to Recommend Composite”, HCAHPS Best Performer – “Communication with Doctors Composite”, HCAHPS Best Performer – “Care Transitions Measures”, HCAHPS Best Performer – “Cleanliness Composite.”
“My team’s collaborative spirit, tireless dedication, and support of one another towards enhancing our patients’ healthcare experience is truly impressive,” said Ernesto A. Cerdena, Director of Outpatient Services at Parkview.  “I want to thank them for all they do, day in and day out, to make Parkview a Top Performing Hospital!”
~ Ernesto A. Cerdena, PhD(C), CRA, FAHRA, FACHE
AHRA Board Member and President Elect
Director of Outpatient Services, Parkview Adventist Medical Center
 
July 15th, 2014

Bravo and big thanks to our 88 Golfers and dozens of volunteers who helped to make this year’s Parkview Classic an enormous success.  Mother Nature cooperated again this year, delivering ample sunshine, even a slight breeze.  Conditions on the Brunswick Golf Club course were outstanding and Pro AJ Kavanaugh and his team were stellar—completely prepared for the fun crowd!

The winning teams are as follows:

1st Place Gross:  HW Staffing Solutions—Nathan Garwood, Peter Metcalf, Scott Coulombe & Shane Reagh (58)

1st Place Net: Sunnybrook Village—Mike Fish, Lee Frietag, Marc Newton, Mark Pelton (49)

2nd Place Net:  Imprivata—Kevin Johnson, Chris McKay, Bill McQuaid, Bill McQuaid Sr.

3rd Place Net:  Parkview Medical Staff—Dr. Peter Dipietrantonio, Bob Murphy, Dwight Summers, Alex Norzow

4th Place Net:  Verrill Dana Team—Richard Moon, Doug Currier, Bill Knowles, Will Styles

Closest to the Pin—-Men:  Ron Pelton;  Women: Marissa O’Neil

Longest Drive—Men: Mike Fish;  Women:  Patty Labbe

Putting Contest—Jim Kane

 

 

 

March 13th, 2014

Article in Times Record Parkview Ranks 9th March 2014

 

Great news for Parkview Adventist Medical Center!  PAMC has been named the ninth best hospital in Maine,and the 15th best in New England when it comes to patient satisfaction.  That’s according to the group GoLocal, which used the latest results from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems, also known as the HCAHPS survey (pronounced H-Caps), a standardized survey instrument and data system which measures patients’ perspective on the care they received while at the hospital. Parkview rated high for how well our doctors and nurses communicated with patients as well how responsivehospital staff were to patient needs.  Read the article in its entirety by clicking the link above.

day, March 11,  • $1.00

 

  

 

According to GoLocal’s

findings cited in a news

release from the hospital,

Parkview’s highest marks

were earned for the hospital

staff ’s communication

skills. The report said 91

percent of patients said they

were given information

about what to do during

their recovery at home.

“We are extremely proud

of this recognition by GoLocal,”

Parkview Adventist

Medical Center President

Randee Reynolds said. “This

ranking reflects the hard

work and dedication our

entire staff strives to provide

our patients every day.

We are grateful to have loyal

patients who appreciate

these efforts. ”

Parkview Adventist Medical

Center is an acute-care,

nonprofit hospital, opened

in July 1959.

SURVEY

From Page A1

The Times Record

BRUNSWICK

Parkview Adventist Medical

Center was named the

ninth best hospital in Maine,

15th best in New England

when it comes to patient satisfaction.

That’s according to the

group GoLocal, which used

the latest results from the

Hospital Consumer Assessment

of Healthcare Providers

and Systems, also known as

the HCAHPS survey — a standardized

survey instrument

and data collection methodology

used since 2006 to measure

patients’ perspectives of

hospital care.

Using this data, GoLocal

conducted its own survey by

asking a random sample of

patients to give feedback

about topics such as how

well nurses and doctors

communicated, how responsive

hospital staff were to

patient needs, how well the

hospital controlled patients’

pain, and the cleanliness

Parkview ranked

9th best in Maine

Survey looks at patient satisfaction

Please see

 

SURVEY

,

Back page this section

 

PARKVIEW

 

Adventist

Medical Center in

 

Brunswick is an acutecare,

 

nonprofit hospital,

 

opened in July 1959.

 

tudy finds

HOME & FAMILY, Page B6

and quietness of the hospital

environment.

According to GoLocal’s

findings cited in a news

release from the hospital,

Parkview’s highest marks

were earned for the hospital

staff ’s communication

skills. The report said 91

percent of patients said they

were given information

about what to do during

their recovery at home.

“We are extremely proud

of this recognition by GoLocal,”

Parkview Adventist

Medical Center President

Randee Reynolds said. “This

ranking reflects the hard

work and dedication our

entire staff strives to provide

our patients every day.

We are grateful to have loyal

patients who appreciate

these efforts. ”

Parkview Adventist Medical

Center is an acute-care,

nonprofit hospital, opened

in July 1959.

SURVEY

From Page A1

The Times Record

BRUNSWICK

Parkview Adventist Medical

Center was named the

ninth best hospital in Maine,

15th best in New England

when it comes to patient satisfaction.

That’s according to the

group GoLocal, which used

the latest results from the

Hospital Consumer Assessment

of Healthcare Providers

and Systems, also known as

the HCAHPS survey — a standardized

survey instrument

and data collection methodology

used since 2006 to measure

patients’ perspectives of

hospital care.

Using this data, GoLocal

conducted its own survey by

asking a random sample of

patients to give feedback

about topics such as how

well nurses and doctors

communicated, how responsive

hospital staff were to

patient needs, how well the

hospital controlled patients’

pain, and the cleanliness

Parkview ranked

9th best in Maine

Survey looks at patient satisfaction

Please see

 

SURVEY

,

Back page this section

 

PARKVIEW

 

Adventist

Medical Center in

 

Brunswick is an acutecare,

 

nonprofit hospital,

 

opened in July 1959.

 

Article in Times Record Parkview Ranks 9th March 2014.pdf

 

 

 

 

Tory Ryden
Director Community Relations/Marketing
Parkview Adventist Medical Center
329 Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine 04011
T: 207.373.2160 F: 207.373.2209
www.parkviewamc.org / tryden@parkviewamc.org

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTE: This message and any included attachments are from Parkview Adventist Medical Center and are intended only for the addressee. The information contained in this message is confidential and may constitute inside or non-public information under international, federal, or state securities laws. Unauthorized forwarding, printing, copying,distribution, or use of such information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you are not the addressee, please promptly delete this message and notify the sender of the delivery error by email, or you may call Parkview Adventist Medical Center in Brunswick,Maine, USA, at 207.373.4522. Thank you.

 

 

December 26th, 2013

            

 

PARKVIEW ADVENTIST MEDICAL CENTER

 

      Community Health Needs Assessment & Implementation Strategy

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Summary………………………………………………………… 1

I.                     Service Area and Population…………………………… 2

II.                   Community Health Needs Assessment Partners…4

III.                 Community Health Needs Assessment Method & Process….. 4

IV.                 Identified Community Needs……………………………. 5

A.      Needs Identified ……………………………………………………… 5

                                                               i.      Obesity………………………….5

                                                              ii.      Diabetes………………………..5

                                                            iii.      Heart Disease ………………..6

                                                            iv.      Mental, Dental Health& Social Support..6

                                                             v.      Access to Care……………… 7

                                                            vi.      Substance Abuse……………7

                                                          vii.      Nutrition & Physical Activity………………….7

                                                         viii.      Physical Environment…….8

                                                             ix.      Transportation………………9

                                                              x.      Family and Community Involvement…….9

B.       Process for Prioritizing……………………………………………. 10

C.       Prioritized Needs……………………………………………………. 11

 

V.                   Community Resources to Address Needs………….13

A.      PAMC Internal Resources……………

B.       External Community-Based Resources………

 

VI.                 Implementation Strategy…………………………………14

A.      How PAMC Will Address Health Needs………

                                                               i.      PAMC Community Health Model……

 

B.       Needs NOT Addressed In PAMC Plan…………

 

Appendix I.  PAMC Service Area 2010 Census Data…………….14

Appendix II.  Key Stakeholder Interview Summary…………….15

Appendix III.  PAMC Service Area 2010 HIP Survey Results.15

Appendix IV. Community Involvement in PAMC CHNA………17

References………………………………………………………………………..17                    

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Rich in tradition, history, and natural beauty, Brunswick is a community of talented, innovative and involved citizens. Brunswick’s residents are fortunate to have access to beautiful recreational areas, high quality educational and medical resources, and growing employment opportunities.

Bordered by the Androscoggin River and Atlantic Ocean with its 67 miles of coastline, Brunswick is a coastal community, offering residents and visitors an array of recreational opportunities. With convenient access to I-295 and Route 1, Brunswick is located 30 miles north of Portland.

Brunswick is home to world-class businesses, including L.L. Bean manufacturing, Bath Iron Works (design/engineering), Owens Corning (composite fabrics) and Molnlycke (surgical and wound care product manufacturer). With its proximity to boat builders and other marine trades along the Maine coast, advanced technology training resources and innovative businesses, Brunswick has positioned itself as the epicenter of the state’s emerging composites manufacturing cluster. Brunswick is home to both Parkview Adventist Medical Center and Mid Coast Hospital and is a service center for neighboring communities.

In Brunswick, community means friendly neighborhoods and markets; inspiring art and culture in world-class venues; unique shopping and great food; healthy outdoor activities in a beautiful environment; a diversity of churches and denominations; and learning opportunities that never end. Bowdoin College, located in the heart of Brunswick’s downtown, infuses the region with spirited, intelligent 18-22 year olds from late August through late May.   These students rely on the restaurants, shops and health care services provided by the two hospitals.

 

In 2012, Brunswick was named one of the Top 20 “Best Small Towns in America” by Smithsonian Magazine due to the high concentration of arts and culture, museums and historical sites per capita.

In 2010, Brunswick was named “Best place to retire”.(Money Magazine)“A classic New England fishing village, Brunswick is picturesque but not isolated, bustling but not hectic”.

 

 

I. Service Area and Population  

From the 2011 Census, some 14,500 residents who call Brunswick home might likely agree with Money Magazine’s findings.  Brunswick is located in the northernmost pocket of Cumberland County, with a population of 14,500.  The town is primarily white (91%), with asian (2.8%) and two or more races (2.3%).  Brunswick’s median income of $42,654 per household is on par with the Cumberland County average. Many of Parkview’s patients live just over the county border in Sagadahoc County, with a population of 35,200, a poverty rate of 10.5% (Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center) and median income of $52,071. 

Both counties are primarily white (Cumberland County 95.7 %) ; (Sagadahoc County  96.5%) with black—Cumberland  (1.06%), black—Sagadahoc (.92%) and two or more races at Cumberland (1.13%) and Sagadahoc (1.21%).   Cumberland County has (53% males) and (47% females) with the highest number of people in the (birth-24) year age range (31.7%) and Sagadahoc County has (48%males) and (52%females) with the highest number of people in the (25-44) year age range (30.5%). 

 

The State of Maine has again claimed the distinction of being the oldest state in the nation.  In this state, Cumberland County has the largest cluster of younger Mainers,

while Androscoggin County has the ‘oldest’ population in the oldest state in the country.  Sagadahoc is right in the middle.

 

The closure of the Brunswick Naval Air Station (BNAS) dealt the Greater Brunswick area a large economic blow, felt in every pocket of the community.  Scores of military families received transfer orders to move to Jacksonville, Florida and other bases.  Those who moved away took thousands of children out of the Brunswick schools, which meant the need for restructuring, and in some cases, closing several schools.  Several locally owned businesses closed, due to lack of activity.  And yes, many people lost jobs.  The base closure forced the area to do things differently, forced business owners to be smarter and forced the town to lure international and national businesses to the region.  Though economists suspected Brunswick and neighboring hamlets might turn into ghost towns, something odd happened:  rather than fold, the region became stronger, determined to succeed despite the departure of the military stronghold.  Within 18 months of the closure of BNAS, the town formed MRRA, the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority.  Through MRRA’s efforts, the Brunswick Landing (redevelopment of the former Brunswick Naval Air Station; and Foreign Trade Zone) and the Brunswick Executive Airport (BXM) were created. As Maine’s premier technology business park and a center for innovation, Brunswick Landing features 3,300 acres of prime real estate, over 2 million square feet of commercial and industrial space, a world-class aviation complex, and on-site educational institutions. Other major employers and redevelopment efforts include:

                        · Brunswick Business Park

                        · Cooks Corner Redevelopment

                        · Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority (MRRA)

                        · Town of Brunswick

· Bath Iron Works

                        · L.L. Bean Manufacturing

· Molnlycke Health Care

 

The 2012  unemployment rate was 7.1%.  According to the state of Maine’s “Unemployment & Labor Force report (maine.gov), Brunswick’s unemployment rate (4.9%) is well below the average.  According to the state statistics, Brunswick’s ‘civilian labor force’ stands at 34,184, with 32,513 gainfully employed and 1,671 unemployed.

 

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cumberland County, Maine’s largest county, reported an employment gain of 0.6 percent from September 2011 to September 2012.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics defines “large” counties as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2011 annual average employment.  Regional Commissioner Deborah A. Brown noted that Cumberland ranked 233rd among the 328 large counties for employment growth nationally.

Nationally, employment increased 1.6 percent during this 12-month period, as 276 of the 328 largest U.S. counties gained jobs.

Employment in Cumberland County stood at 172,400 in September 2012 of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 328 largest counties made up 71.0 percent of total U.S. employment.

The average weekly wage in Cumberland County fell 1.6 percent to $799 in the third quarter of 2012.  Nationally, the average weekly wage decreased 1.1 percent over the year to $906.

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 15 counties in Maine with employment below 75,000. All of these smaller counties had average weekly wages below the national average.

 

Large County Wage Changes

The above average 1.6-percent wage drop in Cumberland County ranked 165th among the 328 largest U.S. counties.  Nationwide, 274 large counties experienced over-the-year decreases in average weekly wages. 

 

Large County Average Weekly Wages

Cumberland County’s average weekly wage of $799 placed in the middle-third of the national ranking at 211th in the third quarter of 2012.

 

Average Weekly Wages in Maine’s Smaller Counties

All 15 counties in Maine with employment below 75,000 had average weekly wages lower than the national average of $906. Lincoln reported the lowest weekly wage among the smaller counties, averaging $560, followed by Piscataquis at $584. Sagadahoc reported the highest weekly wage of any county in Maine, averaging $833 per week.

When all 16 counties in Maine were considered, all had weekly wages that were lower than the national average. Two reported average weekly wages at or below $599, nine reported wages from $600 to $699, four had wages from $700 to $799, and one had wages above $800.  The higher paid counties were concentrated along the southern Atlantic coastline and New Hampshire border.

 

***Tables and additional content from Employment

and Wages Annual Averages 2011 are now available online at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn11.htm.  Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; TDD Message Referral Phone Number: 1-800-877-8339.

 

II.    Community Health Needs Assessment Partners

Parkview works in collaboration with Mid Coast Hospital and the OASIS health network; additionally, PAMC’s management agreement with Central Maine Healthcare factors into the assessment insofar as utilizing ‘shared’ physicians. 

 

III.  Community Health Needs Assessment Methodology and Process

In 2010, in a collaborated effort between the University of Southern Maine and Market Decisions, Inc, an assessment was conducted, designed to identify the most important health issues in the state of Maine, both overall and by county, using scientifically valid health indicators and comparative information.  The assessment identified priority health issues where better integration of public health and healthcare can improve access, quality and cost effectiveness of services to residents of Maine.  The project represents OneMaine’s efforts to share information that can lead to improved health status and quality of care available to Maine residents, while building upon and strengthening Maine’s existing infrastructure of services and providers.   The data used for determining the community health needs of Cumberland County was primarily obtained from the OneMaine Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA).  Additionally, Eastern Maine Health System, MaineGeneral Health, MaineHealth systems, the University of New England Center for Health Planning, Policy and Research (CHPPR) and the University of Sou7thern Maine’s Muskie School for Public Health contributed collaborative public health expertise.  Using a methodology developed by CHPPR over decades of work, the assessment integrates primary data from a telephone survey to heads of households with secondary data retrieved from state databases (ED usage, Mortality, Cancer Registry, etc.)  That data is reviewed in the context of multiple health related domains to develop a composite view of health status, behavioral risks and barriers to access and care.  Results were compared to national and state benchmarks to produce priorities. 

 

IV. Identified Community Needs

 

A.     Needs Identified

 

i. Obesity

Maine is the 23rd most obese state in the nation.  After three decades of increases, adult obesity rates remained level in every state but one. (not Maine)  Maine’s adult obesity rate is 28.4 percent, up from 19.9% in 2003 and 10.9% in 1990.  More men (30.2%) than women (26.6%) are obese in Maine and the highest rate of obesity is among 45-64 year olds (32.5%).  While Parkview does not have surgical services on campus, PAMC physicians do refer patients to the Bariatric Surgery Center at Central Maine Medical Center, in Lewiston, a 35-minute drive from PAMC.  The Center’s Director, Dr. Jamie Loggins, MD, runs Central Maine Bariatric Surgery which includes two highly skilled surgeons (Loggins) and Dr. Stephen Bang, D.O., as well as highly trained bariatric dieticians, nurses and techs.  In addition to surgery, the team offers a full-spectrum of services including nutrition, healthy eating, healthy lifestyle classes and a full spectrum of support.

     

  ii. Diabetes

Diabetes is a complex disease that can lower a person’s quality of life and dramatically reduce their life expectancy.  Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for nearly 234,000 deaths in 2008.  According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 25.8 million people in the US have diabetes;  of these, 18.8 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes and 7 million people have not yet been diagnosed.  Among adults in the US, diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, nontraumatic lower extremity amputations, and new cases of blindness.  Diabetes is also a major cause of heart attack and stroke—people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease or stroke than people who don’t have  diabetes. 

Here in Maine, between 1995 and 2010, the prevalence of diabetes increased from 3.5% to 8.7%, and this rate is identical to the 2010 national median.

In 2009, Maine’s diabetes-related death rate (65.8 per 100,000 population) was significantly lower than that the US (71.2 per 100,000 population).

The prevalence of pre-diabetes among Maine adults who are obese was 3.5 times higher than among Maine adults who are at a healthy weight.  Nearly one in five (18.2%) Maine adults who are obese have been diagnosed with diabetes, a prevalence rate almost 6 times higher than those at a healthy weight.

The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher among Maine adults who do not engage in the recommended amount of physical activity (11.0%) compared to those who do. (5.9%)

In Brunswick, Parkview’s Diabetes Educator reported to the Diabetes Control and Prevention Program that she saw 49 patients from Jan 1 through Dec 13 or 2013.  All but one had Type 2 Diabetes.  All were Caucasian.  This educator conducts quarterly Diabetes Education classes for members of the community.  In addition to information, the department offers cooking demonstrations to teach proper cooking techniques for diabetes.  Additionally, Parkview’s Dietician meets with pre-diabetes and diabetes patients.       

 

iii.Heart Disease  

Nearly 1 out of four deaths in Maine is due to heart disease.  2,815 Mainers died from heart disease in 2006 (22.9% of total deaths in Maine);  670 Mainers died from stroke in 2006 (5.4% of total deaths in Maine).    

Among those 75 years and older, there was a a 30.5% decline in the age specific death rate due to cardiovascular diseases in 1999-2009.  Among those 65-74 years of age, there was a 45.7% decline in the age-specific death rate due to cardiovascular disease from 1999-2009.  Among those 35-64, there was a 17.9% decline in the age-specific death rate due to cardiovascular diseases from 1999-2009.

Parkview offers high level support to patients through its relationship with Central  Maine Medical Center;  specifically, Cardiologists and Cardiac Surgeons with Central Maine Heart and Vascular Institute (CMHVI) who rotate into Parkview seeing patients on the PAMC campus and on the Lewiston-based CMMC campus. 

The Maine Cardiovascular Health Program (MCVHP) works collaboratively with the 28 established Healthy Maine Partnership (HMP) coalitions to address chronic disease prevention through policy and system changes. 

 

iv. Mental Health, Dental Health and Social Support

While Parkview has no specific program assigned to mental health, PAMC internal physicians are trained to identify, diagnose, and treat patients and refer higher level mental health issues and disorders.  Mid Coast Hospital is the assigned area hospital for Mental Health coverage and treatment.

 

Additionally, Brunswick non-profit service agencies have coalesced, joining forces to provide care, funding and attention to those in need; requiring a wide array of free service and treatment.  The Tedford Shelter and Mid Coast Hunger Prevention Center (MCHP) provide housing and nourishment to those who have lost their homes, their jobs and their hope during the economic downturn.  Several Parkview nurses and social workers offer their time each week to homeless individuals at MCHP, where they teach stress and weight management, as well as healthy cooking classes.  Additionally, the Brunswick-based OASIS clinic, staffed by physicians and nurses from both Parkview Adventist Medical Center and Mid Coast Hospital, as well as pediatric dentists, offer free services to the underserved.  OASIS is a health network that offers free health and dental care as well as prescription assistance to uninsured, low-income residents in Southern Midcoast Maine.  OASIS has continually served as a beacon of help and hope for thousands in the region.  

                

 v. Access to Care

 

Brunswick’s median age in 2013 is 41.4 years old.  This compares with 2000, when the median age was 35.5 years.  (In 1970, the median age was 24.3 years)  In addition to the two hospitals (PAMC and MCH), residents can find care at the Urgent Care center in downtown Brunswick (operated by MCH).  Brunswick has experienced the aging trend which has spilled into other regions throughout Maine.  In 2010, 19.4% of Brunswick’s residents were over 65.  That tops Maine’s average of 15.9% by nearly four percent. The town has picked up the reputation as being a prime region for retirees to relocate.    In fact, Money Magazine named Brunswick one of the country’s top communities in which to retire.  To that end, Brunswick is home to four assisted living facilities and nursing homes including Thornton Oaks, Mid Coast Senior Health Center, Thornton Hall Assisted Living and Interim Healthcare;  additionally, Sunnybrook Village Senior Living.  The Highlands (in nearby Topsham) provides multi-layered, multiple needs care for its residents.  Brunswick’s retirement community is in a growth mode.  This growth has created an additional opportunity for additional healthcare services to meet their needs:  Urology, Gastrointerology, Oncology, Cardiology, Pulmonary, Diagnostic Imaging are among those services.

 

vi.Substance Abuse

 

The extent of PAMC’s Substance Abuse prevention programs is the Smoking Cessation Program—a multi-week approach to helping members of the community to stop smoking.   Mid Coast Hospital has a Walk in program called the Addiction Resource Center.  ARC offers a full range of professional treatment services for people with alcohol or drug related problems.  ARC also provides family and co-dependency services to those affected by someone else’s alcohol or drug use.  ARC also treats people with substance abuse problems and mental health issues.  ARC conducts professional assessments and then recommends the best treatment options for problem usage, harmful drinking and drug use patterns, dependency and addiction.  ARC offers individual, family and group counseling as well as intensive outpatient programs (day and evening), medication assisted treatment, family intervention, and prevention services.    

 

vii.Nutrition & Physical Activity

 

Parkview takes an active role in helping the Brunswick community improve their nutrition, diet and exercise patterns/choices.  Parkview, a Seventh-day Adventist hospital, was founded in 1959 on the tenets of the church which embraces and preaches prevention.  Members of the church generally eat a plant-based, vegan diet and embrace a healthy lifestyle that features drinking water, no caffeine or alcohol, abundance of sunshine and fresh air as well as daily activity.  From its beginning, Parkview has reached out to the Brunswick community, offering cooking classes, exercise programs, Diabetes awareness and prevention programs, and the multiple award-winning Life Style Choices program.  LSC is a 10-day program designed specifically for adults who have or who are at risk of developing a chronic health concern such as diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, coronary artery disease, obesity, arthritis, etc. A Registered nurse with a Master’s Degree in public health directs the program. She has additional training in clinical preventive medicine. The medical director is an internal medicine physician who specializes in lifestyle medicine and chronic disease reversal.

Participants attend the program from 5:00 PM to 8:30 PM five days a week for two consecutive weeks. Each class contains no more than 50 people and provides three plant-based meals each day. Participants are together for the evening meal so they eat that together. Breakfast and lunch are sent home with them each evening for the following day. Following the evening meal, physical therapists are present to work with individuals on physical activity. After a demonstration and reverse demonstration, participants who are physically able head outside for a brisk walk. Those with mobility issues are facilitated in the physical therapy gym. Following the physical activity aspect of the program participants reconvene for a cooking demonstration followed by a daily presentation by one of the program specialists.

A wide-range of topics are covered including nutrition, and how nutrition and physical activity affect various disease processes with special attention given to diabetes, cancer and heart disease. In addition, the program covers new research such as advanced glycosylated end products (AGE), epi-genetics, Diabetes Type 3, etc. with a focus on making difficult material readily understandable and relevant to adult learners. Pre and post testing includes a lipid panel and fasting glucose, blood pressure, weight, body composition, hydration level, grip strength, flexibility, a timed mile walk and hip and waist measurement. There is an extensive post program questionnaire completed the last night of the program.

In the early years of Life Style Choices, pre and post program cardiac stress tests were performed on each participant in order to document the positive effects. The results consistently showed improvements in cardiac function, even among those who showed no cardiac issues on the pre-testing. Performing cardiac stress tests on every participant began to be no longer cost effective and were discontinued. However, we continue perform them on participants with strong cardiac indicators or history and the results continue to consistently show improvement.

The program was developed through collaboration between the hospital, a local physician and the health principles of Adventist Health. For more than 50 years Parkview Adventist Medical Center has been committed to promoting the health principals espoused by Adventist Health, all of which are well documented in the literature to reduce the risk of disease. The cost of chronic disease to our economy and to the quality of life of individuals who suffer from chronic disease is also well documented. This program grew out of a desire to eliminate those costs as much as possible and to use the principals espoused by Adventist Health for disease management. It costs the hospital approximately $850 per participant to operate the program. Life Style Choices is funded through the hospital wellness department.

The primary catchment area was intended to be the Mid Coast region of Maine surrounding the hospital, which has approximately 200,000 residents. However we are blessed to have patients come from all over the state of Maine and from many other states around the country. In fact, this program has attracted participants from several different foreign countries.

Each 10-day session is intense and has proved successful.  Dr. Timothy Howe, MD, an internal medicine physician, oversees the program.  His vegan, increased activity approach has helped patients lose weight, lower LDL cholesterol and high blood sugar and blood pressure.  The outcomes for this program have been tracked over the past 15 years and have been very consistent. In just 10 days, participants experience reductions of 30 to 50 points in their total cholesterol, 30 points in triglycerides, 20 points in LDL cholesterol, 5 pounds of weight, etc. while also enjoying increased energy, better sleep and an overall increase in well-being. In addition, participants are able to reduce and in some cases eliminate altogether the amount of medication they take for diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol. This translates into a cost savings for individuals and reduced side effects from those medications.

The program has also been effective for patients suffering from urinary incontinence, fibromyalgia and other types of chronic problems. One participant reported that she was scheduled for surgery for urinary incontinence but as a result of attending the LSC program, she no longer needed the surgical intervention.

We regularly receive patients who have run out of other options for treatment. For various reasons they are no longer surgical candidates and many have been sent home to “get their affairs in order”. David was just such a patient. He was in his late 70’s and his heart disease was so advanced and his co morbidities so complicated that his physician informed him that there was nothing left for them to do. David told us, “I wasn’t ready to die. They told me to go home and get my affairs in order. Instead I called the Lifestyle Choices program and they gave me my life back! I was supposed to be dead three years go, but because of what I learned at the Lifestyle Choices program, I’m headed to Brazil for vacation!”

Richard had a similar experience. “I joined the program, but had to take 3 nitroglycerine tablets just to get from my car in the front of the hospital into the

classroom. By the end of the program I was walking a mile each day totally free of pain and now I’m walking 3-miles every day. And I’ve lost 53 pounds!”

Mid Coast Hospital, also in Brunswick, has adopted a program of its own called the Center for Weight and Lifestyle Change.  The multi-disciplinary outpatient weight loss program meets once a week at the hospital. The program is run by a dietician, a nurse, a psychotherapist and a medical director.  Both programs encourage long term lifestyle changes that will instill improved, lifelong health habits.

 

viii.Physical Environment

 

Brunswick’s location lends residents a bountiful array of options for outdoor health.   With four seasons to enjoy, our parks and public spaces and programs boast endless opportunities for residents and visitors to live an active lifestyle, offering a wide variety of options for people of all ages in diverse settings. Our common spaces range from lush places for play, parks, wooded trails, river access, and a gateway to the beautiful islands of Casco Bay.

                        · Androscoggin River Bicycle Path, for walking and biking, recipient of the East Coast Greenway Alliance Trail of Merit Award

                        · Androscoggin River Walk

                        · Mere Point Boat Launch, access to northern Casco Bay and the Maine Island Trail

                        · Historic Town Commons Trails

                        · Maquoit Bay Conservation Lands

                        · Cox Pinnacle Trails and Crystal Spring Farm Trails

                        · Information regarding these sites, parks and recreation programs and more can be found at www.brunswickme.org/departments/parks-recreation/ and www.btlt.org. Brunswick Parks and Recreation received the Sports Illustrated Good Sports Community Award.

 

Brunswick offers healthy living and outdoor adventures for all ages. Brunswick is a forward-thinking, health-conscious and prevention-centered town. Care providers place great importance on the whole person: mind, body, spirit. From acupuncture to therapy to surgery, beautiful Brunswick provides the perfect backdrop to inspire good health!

                        · Hospitals: Parkview Adventist Medical Center and Mid Coast Hospital

                        · Primary care specialists, allied health services, hospice

                        · Walk-In Clinic

· Yoga, fitness, golf, martial arts and more

 

 

ix. Transportation

 

Parkview Adventist Medical Center is a founding participant in the community transportation program called The Brunswick Explorer.  The Brunswick Explorer picks up and delivers all over Brunswick from the downtown shopping areas to both hospitals (Parkview and Mid Coast Hospital, which is 2 miles from downtown), People Plus (a community hub for both the elderly and young), grocery stores, library, Bowdoin College and beyond.  Fare for the Explorer is $1,making the service affordable to the community at large. 

x.Family and Community Involvement

Parkview is involved in an array of community programs including CHIP at Curtis Memorial Library (Community Health Information Partnership.  Parkview and MidCoast Hospitals are partners in the CHIP Program, which provides current quality health and wellness information in a variety of formats to residents of the MidCoast (Greater Brunswick) region.  Over the past ten years, CHIP has bought thousands of items that are available at Curtis Library or through inter-library loan to residents of the area.   Parkview has played an active role in the Brunswick area American Heart Association fundraisers. (the past three years the “Heart Ball” has raised just under $10,000 for the Maine Chapter of the AHA).  Parkview works in collaboration with Mid Coast Hospital, Central Maine Medical Center as well as a variety of other companies and business in the Brunswick region.  Parkview supports the Southern Midcoast Maine and Freeport Chambers of Commerce and participates in annual and semi-annual fundraisers.  Additionally, Parkview provides space, free of charge, for groups to gather.

CME courses are offered, as area addiction prevention classes, United Way presentations, and community outreach discussions and talks by physicians and surgeons.

Parkview is involved with the two local high schools: Brunswick High School and Mt. Ararat.  Students from these schools take part in quarterly community service projects in which they tour the hospital and engage in Q & A with physicians, nurses and members of the PAMC staff.  Additionally, Parkview works closely with the Tech 10 Regional High School which offers a CNA training course.  These CNA’s in training get hands-on

experience in Parkview’s Med Surg area and work closely with RN’s.  

In addition, Parkview has played a pivotal role in annual fundraisers for The  Dempsey Challenge for the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope and Healing, The American Cancer Society, The Lung Association, Alzheimer’s and the Muscular Dystrophy Association.  

Brunswick offers an educated workforce with Bowdoin College, Southern Maine Community College, Southern New Hampshire University and the University of Maine Engineering Department all operating within the Brunswick community. (*NB (note well):  UMaine’s Engineering Department students are engaged in an innovative, hands-on program, (in space that’s based on the former BNAS campus) giving students an integrated approach to earning the first two years of a four year engineering degree, taught by professors recognized nationally for their expertise.   Additionally, Brunswick’s strategic location bolsters the town’s attraction as a destination town, with excellent dining, excellent schools and consistently high-level medical care.

 

 

B.     Process for Prioritizing     Health InfoNet is a prime example of Maine health care providers’ willingness to share information for the betterment of patient care.  This state computerized initiative allows a patient’s records to follow them, electronically, wherever they need care.  For instance, if a patient is hurt on vacation in Fort Kent, their hometown health records in York can be accessed through Health InfoNet in mere seconds.

C.     Prioritized Needs

Health Needs Identified

Maine has several socio-demographic characteristics that may impact the health indicators in Cumberland and Sagadahoc Counties.  For instance, Cumberland County has the youngest population in the state.  This age group skews high in percentage of population for using (and abusing) alcohol and drugs.  This also factors in a higher than average Emergency Department visits for drug and alcohol related treatment.  Additionally, childhood obesity paired with teenage drinking place Maine youth at both immediate and future risk of poor health and underscores a need for prevention interventions involving local organizations.  High rates of two or more so-called ‘youth risk behaviors’ were identified in 6 northern Maine counties; while hospital admission rates of youth for depression and suicidal tendencies are highest in 6 midcoast and southern Maine communities INCLUDING Cumberland and Sagadahoc counties.

 

Health Issues

Behavioral health risk factors such as smoking, obesity and sedentary lifestyle continue to be priority health issues in several, mostly rural counties and throughout the state.  Smoking rates are high in Maine (22%) despite Smoking Cessation efforts (such as the successful program offered at Parkview Adventist Medical Center—PAMC).   Obesity is a significant health concern.  Currently, approximately 112,000 adults in Maine are obese, having a body mass index greater than or equal to 30(28% in Maine).  This is comparable to the US rate of 28%, with several counties well above the state average.(38%+)  Cumberland county reports 24% and Sagadahoc County reports 23% of obese adults.  Leading a sedentary lifestyle is prevalent in many counties. 

 

 

Risk Factor Prevalence

Despite the known harmful effects of smoking as the leading cause of respiratory illnesses, the proportion of the population with COPD or asthma who continue to smoke is high in most regions.  Patients suffering from these conditions who continue to smoke is high in most regions of Maine.  Patients suffering from these conditions who continue to smoke will have difficulty keeping their disease from progressing, as well as managing additional side effects from their illness.

 

Smoking prevalence is higher among those with diagnosed respiratory illnesses, especially COPD and asthma.  Across the state, 36% of patients with COPD and 25% of patients with asthma continue to smoke.  The highest proportion of patients with COPD who continue to smoke are in Sagadahoc (49%) and Washington (53%) counties.  Cumberland county(9.3%) has the lowest smoking prevalence among those with current asthma.

 

The Respiratory health profile of the populations of Maine suggests risk factors, disease morbidity and mortality are high in many Maine counties, especially rural regions.  Smoking continues to be a challenge in many areas of Maine, and explains a large proportion of the disease and death rates.  Access to and availability of primary prevention and treatment modalities for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung disease are priorities for follow-up.

Asthma is gripping the nation (literally).  According to the CDC, Asthma affects an estimated 16.4 million adults in America (18 years and older) and 7 million children. 

According to state numbers, Maine asthma rates among adults are the highest in the country (9% of all adults).  Among children, 8.4% of kindergarten students and 8.9% of all other students have asthma.  It is estimated that there are 65,000 (or more) school absences each year in Maine due to asthma.  The rate of asthma in Maine has doubled in the last 20 years, with the burden falling disproportionately on low income and minority communities.  In 2008, there were more than 4,500 hospitalizations due to asthma, and more than 45 deaths due to asthma.  While medicine is becoming more readily available to asthma patients, education remains a concern.  According to the CDC, of 389 patients asked whether they’ve ever been taught how to recognize early signs/symptoms of an asthma episode, only 71% responded yes.  Of 382 who were asked whether they have ever been given an asthma action plan, a mere 37% responded yes.  Just 9% of the 397 polled answered yes to ever taking a course on how to manage asthma.  Education is a critical tool in reaching asthma patients.

COPD has risen to alarming rates in Maine.  According to the ME CDC and the American Lung Association, more than 48,000 women (8% of Maine’s population), suffer from the chronic respiratory disease COPD.  Women are 37 percent more likely than men to be diagnosed and now account for more than half of all COPD deaths nationally. COPD refers to a group of progressive lung diseases that make breathing difficult, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis.  It is the 3rd leading cause of death in the US and trails heart disease and cancer. Smoking is the primary cause of COPD, although it’s been linked to genetics and some environmental pollutants.    In April 2013, The American Lung Association released its 14th annual “State of the Air” report.  The report covered the two most widespread types of air pollution:  ozone, the main ingredient in smog and air-particle pollution, sometimes called soot.  These particles can lodge deep in lung tissue and even pass into the bloodstream.  Spikes in pollution, according to the American Lung Association, can contribute to heart attacks and stroke, while exposure over months and years contributes to cancer.

 

 

STI’s

State Infectious Disease Data

The Maine CDC Division of Infectious Disease18 provided incidence rates for HIV/AIDS,

sexual transmitted diseases, and viral hepatitis. Chlamydia/Gonorrhea: 2008 data, from the Maine CDC Division of Infectious Disease, HIV, STD and Viral Hepatitis Program.19 Hepatitis C: 2007-2009 data. HIV: from the 2009 Annual Surveillance Report Maine CDC Division of Infectious Disease

According to results in a Maine HIV/STD Surveillance Program Summary Report, Cumberland County’s cases of Chlamydia dropped by two percentage points from 2011 to 2012—746 cases.  Mid Coast Maine reported 278 cases for 2012.  Gonorrhea cases, however, were up in Cumberland (110—11 more than in 2011); and MidCoast’s cases jumped by 12.  Syphilis cases increased in Cumberland by four (10 cases in 2012) while there were no cases reported in 2012 in Mid Coast Maine (2 reported in 2011).  Some good news on the HIV front:  Cumberland reporting improved numbers (26 cases in 2011, 20 reported in 2012); Mid Coast also saw improvement—1 case in 2012, while there were two the year prior.  AIDS cases in Cumberland also improved (14 in 2011) 5 in 2012;  MidCoast had no cases in 2012 (3 cases in 2011). 

 

Cancer

Maine has among the highest age-adjusted cancer incidence and mortality rates in the US.  While US incidence rates have been declining in recent years, Maine’s cancer rates have remained high.  The reason Maine’s rates are high is not clear, but may be a reflection of improved screening rates.  Although Maine’s all-cancer mortality rate has been declining, the 2005-2007 rate was the 7th highest in the nation.

Lung Cancer mortality/incidence ratios are highest in Franklin (96%) followed by Sagadahoc (91%) counties compared to the state average (73%).  The rate is higher for women than men in Sagadahoc county.  Early lung cancer detection, while differing by county, does not differ much by gender.

 Prostate Cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among the male population.  Prostate cancer incidence rates are elevated in Sagadahoc county in addition to Hancock, Lincoln, Piscataquis and Washington counties.  Incidence rates of prostate cancer have increased in Maine over the past 10 years as the population ages.  Over two-thirds of men age 50+ report having a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test in the past 2 years;  Cumberland, Kennebec and York county men have the highest rates.

 

 

V. Community Resources to Address Needs

A.     PAMC Internal Resources  Programs including LifeStyle Choices, Smoking Cessation, Living with Diabetes educational program;  Grief Counseling

B.     External Community-Based Resources Brunswick: A Healthy Lifestyle (collaborative guide between Brunswick Downtown Association and Marketing professionals from 20 organizations in Brunswick) Brunswick’s location lends residents a bountiful array of options for outdoor health.   With four seasons to enjoy, our parks and public spaces and programs boast endless opportunities for residents and visitors to live an active lifestyle, offering a wide variety of options for people of all ages in diverse settings. Our common spaces range from lush places for play, parks, wooded trails, river access, and a gateway to the beautiful islands of Casco Bay.

                  * Androscoggin River Bicycle Path, for walking and biking, recipient of the East Coast Greenway Alliance Trail of Merit Award

                  * Androscoggin River Walk

                   Mere Point Boat Launch, access to northern Casco Bay and the Maine Island Trail

                  * Historic Town Commons Trails

                  * Maquoit Bay Conservation Lands

                  * Cox Pinnacle Trails and Crystal Spring Farm Trails

* Information regarding these sites, parks and recreation programs and more can be found at www.brunswickme.org/departments/parks-recreation/ and www.btlt.org. Brunswick Parks and Recreation received the Sports Illustrated Good Sports Community Award. Brunswick offers healthy living and outdoor adventures for all ages. Brunswick is a forward-thinking, health-conscious and prevention-centered town. Care providers place great importance on the whole person: mind, body, spirit. From acupuncture to therapy to surgery, beautiful Brunswick provides the perfect backdrop to inspire good health!

                  * Hospitals: Parkview Adventist Medical Center and Mid Coast Hospital

                  * Primary care specialists, allied health services, hospice

      * Walk-In Clinic

  • Yoga, fitness, golf, martial arts and more

 

VII.        Implementation Strategy

A.    How PAMC will Address Health

                                                              i.      PAMC Community Needs Health Model  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates the perfect opportunity for community health facilities, such as PAMC, to accelerate community health improvement programs and approaches to improved health. Giving the community at large free and easy access to educational, inspirational forums will allow for population wide health interventions as well as measurable results.  Parkview’s fully transparent mode of operation will help to improve community engagement in healthcare (their own and others’) and will require PAMC to continue its practice of accountability.  

B.    Needs Not Addressed in PAMC Plan

Response and Deficit in Region

The identification of the above issues reveals a deficit in services to counter both adult and youth health risk behaviors.  Additionally, the assessment outlines that nutrition and physical activity being the primary determinants of obesity, need to be encouraged both in schools and at home to prevent diabetes.  Smoking is implicated in many preventable deaths, and most smokers start in their teens.  Similarly, alcohol and drug use behaviors are established early in life, usually before the legal age.  These risk behaviors have been identified in clusters.  Trends in high risk behaviors….including Cumberland and Sagadahoc, with high rates of one risk behavior often have high rates of others.

 

 

Appendix I    PAMC Service Area 2010 Census Data Primary Care Quality and Effectiveness

Access to and availability of high quality, primary care, especially for those with chronic health conditions, is a continuing challenge in Maine.  This is an issue in many Maine counties and may be due to inadequate availability of providers and lack of health insurance or lack of patient self-management, among other patient, health system or population issues.

 

Hospital Inpatient and Emergency Department (ED) Data

Discharge datasets for inpatient admissions and emergency department visits are from the Maine Health Data Organization16. For each dataset, the two most recent years of available data were acquired. Inpatient admission data is from Q4 2007 through Q3 2009. Emergency department data is for 2007 and 2008.

Cancer Registry

The Maine Cancer Registry (MCR)17 is a statewide population-based cancer surveillance

system. The MCR collects data on all newly diagnosed and treated cancers in Maine residents, except in situ cervical cancer and basal and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Data was obtained from the MCR for 2005 through 2007 to compute incidence rates and staging levels of selected cancers.

 

 

Appendix II  Key Stakeholders Interview Summary PAMC Stakeholders share the vision of the founders of Parkview Adventist Medical Center in 1959: the primary concern is utilizing Prevention through the tenets of the Seventh-day Adventist faith to keep community members health.  However, when community members do become ill, the hospital’s main objective is to gently care for patients through the guidance and love as exemplified by the Teachings of Jesus Christ.  

 

 

Appendix III  PAMC Service Area 2010 HIP Survey ResultsHousehold Survey Questionnaire Design: The household survey questionnaire used in the OneMaine CHNA was developed collaboratively by the OneMaine Health Collaborative, the University of New England Center for Community and Public Health (CCPH), The University of Southern Maine Muskie School of Public Service, and Market Decisions. An initial review of elements contained in prior community health needs assessments was conducted by CCPH, in consultation with the CHNA

Steering Committee, to determine specific data needs. A preliminary draft of the survey

instrument was submitted to the three hospital systems of OneMaine in April, 2010. In

subsequent weeks, refinements to the draft survey were made in a series of meetings with all key constituents, and a final pretest version of the survey was completed and tested. The survey gathered information from Maine residents in the following areas:

• Health Services Access and Utilization

• Functional Health Status and Chronic Conditions

• Chronic Disease Management

• Youth Health and Health Care

• Exercise

• Primary Care

• Height and Weight

• Dental Care

• Mental Health

• Risk Factors

• Intimate Partner Violence

• Health Insurance

• Health Care Barriers

• Community Health Needs

• Wellness Activities and Programs

• Alternative Therapies

• End of Life Care

• Demographics

The data collection phase began on June 17, and was completed by September 16, 2010. A total of 7,099 Maine residents were interviewed during this period.

 

Sampling Methodology

The sampling process used during the CHNA survey consisted of three steps designed to meet overall statewide targets, as well as specific targets within each of Maine’s sixteen counties.

Target Population

The target population consisted of all adults in families living in permanent residences in Maine.

Qualified households were considered those in which someone resided at least six months of the year. Persons residing in households where no adult age 18 or over was present were excluded. The sampling approach relied on the use of a Random Digit Dial (RDD) land-line telephone sample and a cell phone sample.

The Health Status Profile created for the state and for each county, required a comprehensive set of indicators to measure critical aspects of Maine’s health care delivery system, including health status, access to care, and quality of care. Health status – the present state of wellness or illness in a community – is defined by indicators of beneficial and harmful health behaviors, the presence of symptoms and conditions indicative of illness and wellness, measures of the burden of illness

in a community, the prevalence and incidence of specific diseases, and mortality. Because health status is the most important factor driving the demand for health care services, the first step in this assessment was to describe the health status of Maine and its 16 counties. To accomplish this, a comprehensive set of health and medical indicators for each of the 16 counties and the state was constructed and analyzed.

Most indicators were derived from public data sources, including state birth and death records, hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) datasets, cancer registry data, U.S. Census data, state infectious disease data, the Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS), and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey (see Appendix I). Other indicators were derived from a random sample household telephone survey conducted specifically for this study.

 

 

Sample Definition

The goal of the sampling approach was to obtain both statewide and county level population information on a range of health and healthcare issues. The sampling methodology relied on a three stage sampling approach:

• Stage 1: A stratified RDD sample with 16 independent sampling strata identified by the 16 counties in Maine. This stratification was included in the sampling design to obtain a minimum of 400 completed surveys in each Maine county, and allow analysis of the data at the county level.

• Stage 2: A statewide cell phone sample including households with only cellular phone service, in order to include households and residents without access to a land-line telephone. Cell phone only samples can currently be designed to target a state or telephone area code but not smaller geographic units within a state. Given this constraint, the study relied on a random sample of cell phone numbers within the 207 area code for a statewide sampling frame.

• Stage 3: A statewide over-sample of residents aged 18 to 34. One of the concerns in conducting survey research is that those aged 18-34 tend to be under-represented among those completing surveys. To help offset this lack of response for those age 18-34, it was decided to incorporate an over sample of this age group into the overall sampling methodology. The goal of the sampling strategy was to gather data from a minimum of 6,700 Maine households, with a minimum of 400 residents from each of Maine’s 16 counties. Within this target goal of 6,700, the sampling methodology was also designed to complete a minimum of 300 surveys with “cell phone only” households.

SECONDARY DATA

Below are brief descriptions of key secondary datasets used for this assessment.

 

 

Appendix IV  Community Involvement in PAMC CHNA References

 

CHNA Input   

The following research consultants contributed advice and development to the creation of the assessment:  Carol Bell, Healthy Maine Partnership Director; Kelly Bentley, Healthy Maine Partnership Director; Gail Dana-Sacco, Wabanaki Center (serving Maine Tribal populations); Patricia Hart, Maine Development Foundation; Barbara Leonard, MPH, Maine Health Access Foundation (philanthropic foundation focused on access to care in Maine); Becca Matusovich, Maine Center for Disease Control; Lisa Miller, Bingham Foundation (philanthropic foundation); Dora Ann Mills, MD, Maine Center for Disease Control; Elizabeth Mitchell, Maine Health Management Coalition (representing the state’s major employers, insurers and providers); Trish Riley, Governor’s Office of Health Policy and Finance (GOHPF); Brian Rines, Advisory Committee for Healthy System Development (overseen by GOHPF); Rachel Talbot-Ross, Maine Chapter, NAACP; Ted Trainer, Public Health Coordinating Council;  Shawn Yardley, City of Bangor’s Department of Health and Welfare.  In the local area served by the assessment, multiple parties were engaged in dissemination of the assessment findings and establishment priorities.

 

 

References

For the most recent OneMaine Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) a modified version of the University of New England’s Center for Community and Public Health (CCPH)’s Community and Institutional Assessment Process (CIAP) was used. The CIAP uses epidemiological modeling of demographic, health access, utilization and related population based health and health related indicators, together with qualitative information from health service providers and the community, to identify health status and service need issues in a geographic area and population. The CIAP starts with a comprehensive epidemiological-based health profile organized by health domain or condition such as cardiovascular health, respiratory health, cancer health, etc. Indicators for most domains are organized by risk factors, prevalence (or incidence) of disease or condition, care management indicators and care outcomes. The analysis of indicators within each domain provides information to identify and subsequently explore which aspects of the health care delivery system may be over- or under-performing for

that particular domain (e.g. primary prevention, secondary prevention, etc.). This results in a list of priority health issues and questions for follow-up with domain related providers, community leaders, agencies and the public, to determine delivery system strengths and deficits that may be driving the indicators.

For the OneMaine CHNA the CIAP methodology was used to produce a list of priority health issues and questions for follow-up, with recommendations for next steps to address these issues.

The OneMaine health systems brought this information to their individual communities to gain insight on the specific delivery system issues that might be the focus of change in each community. The goal is to eventually improve results for these indicators.

Indicators within each domain are produced as actual population rates or proportions. They are not adjusted for age, gender or other population artifacts. Unadjusted or “crude” rates capture the true burden of disease in a population – that is, the estimated size of the population that the health care system needs to consider. This information is critical for health services planning and is lost if rates are adjusted. To better understand the status of a health domain in a population, the actual rates are analyzed by the following sub-populations: gender; age groups; and/or race and ethnicity, provided the data are available and it is appropriate from a population health or clinical

perspective. In the CIAP one generally does not test for statistical significance of rates between two or more populations. This assessment is not hypothesis testing research, and much of the information leading to the identification of priority health issues is by examining a pattern of indicators for a particular health condition. The fact that any one rate in a series of indicators is statistically significant does not add additional information for identifying or planning health interventions for a population. Once a pattern of indicators that taken together suggests a follow-up analysis is warranted, one might want to consider statistical testing in special circumstances to further examine a particular area of the population.

The One-Maine assessment focuses on the state as a whole, and on each of Maine’s 16 counties. Thus, the Health Status Profile contains 18 columns of indicators – one for the state and one for each county. National indicators are in an additional column, and compare Maine to the US.

However, the number of US indicators is limited in part by the difficulty of obtaining unadjusted national data. Due to the overwhelming number of data points, analyzing indicators by domains for 16 counties and the state presented a challenge. To identify domain and sub-domain differences by county that are different from the state and thus require additional follow-up, the study team adopted the use of the “10% rule”.

The application of this rule meant that indicators 10% or more above or below the state are worth noting for follow-up. Generally, the domain specific analyses in the report used this rule.

In sum, the CHNA methodology using CIAP is a systematic analysis of scientific based health and health related indicators about a population that informs the development of better health services planning. The analysis conducted using the above approach is meant to tell a story, a story based on a series of indicators that define the dimensions of health in a population. This leads to an initial identification of priority health issues for further action. Follow-up with qualitative information from key informants leads to the identification of specific actions and services which, if implemented, are likely to improve the indicators for that domain, thus improving care and the health status of the population.

To help guide the process used for the OneMaine assessment, a CHNA Steering Committee with representatives from the three OneMaine health systems was convened. This committee’s role was to provide input on: (a) identification of existing data sources for the study; (b) content of the community household telephone survey questionnaire; (c) interpretation of survey findings; (d) review of recommendations, and; (e) data dissemination and a follow-up plan. The CHNA Steering Committee also ensured that information from other local health assessments was integrated into the OneMaine CHNA.

In addition to the OneMaine CHNA Steering Committee, an Advisory Committee was convened with statewide representation from a diverse group of stakeholders. Committee members represented public health, state government, businesses, foundations, and multicultural organizations. The Advisory Committee provided critical input into the needs assessment, from initial concept to how the data would be shared with communities. The OneMaine Health Collaborative formed the Advisory Committee to ensure that the data would meet the needs of end users.

To better understand the status of a health domain in a population, the actual rates are analyzed by the following sub-populations: gender; age groups; and/or race and ethnicity, provided the data are available and it is appropriate from a population health or clinical perspective. In the CIAP one generally does not test for statistical significance of rates between two or more populations. This assessment is not hypothesis testing research, and much of the information leading to the identification of priority health issues is by examining a pattern of indicators for a particular health condition. The fact that any one rate in a series of indicators is statistically significant does not add additional information for identifying or planning health interventions for a population. Once a pattern of indicators that taken together suggests a follow-up analysis is warranted, one might want to consider statistical testing in special circumstances to further examine a particular area of the population.

The One-Maine assessment focuses on the state as a whole, and on each of Maine’s 16 counties. Thus, the Health Status Profile contains 18 columns of indicators – one for the state and one for each county. National indicators are in an additional column, and compare Maine to the US.  However, the number of US indicators is limited in part by the difficulty of obtaining unadjusted national data. Due to the overwhelming number of data points, analyzing indicators by domains for 16 counties and the state presented a challenge. To identify domain and sub-domain differences by county that are different from the state and thus require additional follow-up, the study team adopted the use of the “10% rule”.

The application of this rule meant that indicators 10% or more above or below the state are worth noting for follow-up. Generally, the domain specific analyses in the report used this rule.  In sum, the CHNA methodology using CIAP is a systematic analysis of scientific based health and health related indicators about a population that informs the development of better health services planning. The analysis conducted using the above approach is meant to tell a story, a story based on a series of indicators that define the dimensions of health in a population. This leads to an initial identification of priority health issues for further action. Follow-up with qualitative information from key informants leads to the identification of specific actions and services which, if implemented, are likely to improve the indicators for that domain, thus

improving care and the health status of the population.

To help guide the process used for the OneMaine assessment, a CHNA Steering Committee with representatives from the three OneMaine health systems was convened. This committee’s role was to provide input on: (a) identification of existing data sources for the study; (b) content of the community household telephone survey questionnaire; (c) interpretation of survey findings; (d) review of recommendations, and; (e) data dissemination and a follow-up plan. The CHNA Steering Committee also ensured that information from other local health assessments was integrated into the OneMaine CHNA.

Population Estimates and Demographics

Population data for each county by age was accessed from the US Census using 2008 Census estimates. These estimates were also used to determine all rates (e.g. hospitalization rates) that included population based denominators. Since inter-census population estimates do not include education, income and employment breakdowns, 2000 Census data was used for the education indicator. Although preliminary 2010 Census data were released in early 2011, only overall state

population figures are available, not information on geographic, gender, or age groups within the state. Median household income was obtained through the Maine State Planning Office data center, and data for unemployment by county was obtained through the Maine Department of Labor. The 2004 Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Area Resource File was used to estimate Medicaid participation by county.

Births and Mortality

The Office of Data Research and Vital Statistics at the Maine Centers for Disease Control at the Maine CDC provided birth and mortality datasets for 2007, 2008 and 2009.

 

Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS)

The Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS) is designed to assess the health status of Maine’s youth, and determine the positive and negative attitudes and behaviors that influence healthy development. The MIYHS is a collaborative effort of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Office of Substance Abuse in the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Education. It replaces the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), the Maine Youth Drug and Alcohol Use Survey (MYDAUS), the Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS) and the Maine Child’s Health Survey, and incorporates questions from Search Institute’s Assets Survey.

Data from the 2009 Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey was used to determine indicators related to the health status of Maine youth.

Maine BRFSS

Maine’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a population-based survey conducted throughout the year with robust sampling for state-level estimates. However, for many county-level estimates, more than one year of data must be combined in order to get an adequate sample size at this geographic level. Since BRFSS questionnaires are revised annually, and many questions are not asked every year, the two most recent years of data collection for all BRFSS indicators needed were identified and combined for estimates.

 

 

 

 

June 20th, 2013

PARKVIEW Receives Awards for Excellence

Brunswick, ME- – Parkview Adventist Medical Center has been recognized for its excellence in Patient Care in its Emergency Department by Avatar Solutions (formerly Avatar International LLC and HR Solutions International Inc.). Avatar, a leading provider of Patient, CAHPS, Employee, and Physician Surveys, presented Parkview with two distinct awards:

· The Five Star Service Award
· The Five Star Service Loyalty Endorsement Award

Each of the awards honors Parkview for having the highest score in the Emergency Department and acknowledges the hospital’s consistently high standards of patient care. Avatar Solutions’ awards are meant to honor significant accomplishments in patient satisfaction and innovation in healthcare settings.

“Avatar award winners are leading their peers in their dedication to service excellence and performance in healthcare,” said Jeff Brady, CEO and President of Avatar Solutions. “The awards signify these organizations used information gathered from their patients to improve the quality of care available at their organization.”

“We know the quality of safe care our Emergency Department delivers, day in and day out, “ said Randee Reynolds, CEO and President of Parkview Adventist Medical Center. “These awards reflect the type of compassionate care and outstanding service our employees are delivering. These accolades will inspire all of us at Parkview to continue to improve.”

The Way Avatar Works:
Avatar Solutions uses a comprehensive system in which patients are asked to grade their hospital experience through a survey. The exemplary grades given to Parkview were determined by questions that included whether the patient would prefer to return to Parkview without hesitation, if care is needed, and whether the patient would recommend Parkview without hesitation to others.

Avatar Solutions (formerly Avatar International LLC and HR Solutions International Inc.) is an innovative survey, data measurement, and performance improvement company with over 30 years of experience. Avatar provides CAHPS Surveys, Patient Satisfaction Surveys, Employee Surveys and Physician Surveys to over 500 hospitals and 13,000 clinicians nationwide. Avatar is the American Hospital Association’s exclusively-endorsed provider for Employee / Exit Surveys and Physician Engagement / Opinion Surveys to their 5,000 hospitals and healthcare systems. Avatar works with some of the most well-known organizations in the nation, allowing our clients to benchmark against the best. For more information, please visit http://www.avatarsolutions.com.
# # #

March 27th, 2013

For Immediate Release Contact: Tory Ryden
March 27, 2013 Phone 207.373.2160

Parkview Receives GOLD STAR and Special Recognition for Tobacco Free Policies and Smoking Cessation Program

Brunswick, Maine, March 27, 2013 –Parkview Adventist Medical Center has been honored once again with the Gold Star by the Maine Tobacco-Free Hospital Network for “Leading the way to Healthier Communities” at the group’s annual awards ceremony in Augusta. Parkview was one of 13 hospitals in Maine to receive this distinction. “I am proud of the work that we do each day to provide quality healthcare to our patients in an environment that promotes the Tobacco-free message, “said Randee Reynolds, President at Parkview Adventist Medical Center. “Parkview was founded on the principals of wellness and our mission speaks clearly to the importance of not only living a healthy lifestyle, but providing a healthy environment for our patients and employees,” Reynolds added.

In addition to the Gold Star, Parkview and its ”Breathe Free” Program, championed by Dennis Farley, of Parkview’s Cardio-Pulmonolgy department, were also singled out as one of five Gold Star Champion Honorees. Breathe Free is a multi-week smoking cessation program that has helped many in the Greater Brunswick region permanently stop using tobacco. A form of the program has been in existence at Parkview since the hospital’s beginnings in 1959.

Parkview received the two top awards during a special Wednesday morning program at the Maine Hospital Association in Augusta. Among the other four programs awarded the Gold Star Champion Honorees: Laird Covey, outgoing President of Central Maine Medical Center, Carolyn Burgess from Goodall Hospital, Jim Fortunato from RFGH, the Be Tobacco Free Program at SMMC, the Works on Wellness Council (WCGH), and Barbara Perry from MaineHealth.

Learn more about the MTFHN Gold Star Standards of Excellency by visiting: www.MaineTobaccoFreeHospitalNetwork.org

March 14th, 2013

Life is like a cup of hot chocolate

A group of graduates, well established in their careers, were talking at a reunion and decided to go visit their old university professor, now retired. During their visit, the conversation turned to complaints about stress in their work and lives. Offering his guests hot chocolate, the professor went into the kitchen and returned with a large pot of hot chocolate and an assortment of cups – porcelain, glass, crystal, some plain looking, some expensive, some exquisite – telling them to help themselves to the hot chocolate.

When they all had a cup of hot chocolate in hand, the professor said: “Notice that all the nice looking, expensive cups were taken, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones. While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress. The cup that you’re drinking from adds nothing to the quality of the hot chocolate. In most cases it is just more expensive and in some cases even hides what we drink. What all of you really wanted was hot chocolate, not the cup; but you consciously went for the best cups… And then you began eyeing each other’s cups.

Now consider this: Life is the hot chocolate; your job, money and position in society are the cups. They are just tools to hold and contain life. The cup you have does not define, nor change the quality of life you have. Sometimes, by concentrating only on the cup, we fail to enjoy the hot chocolate God has provided us. God makes the hot chocolate, man chooses the cups. The happiest people don’t have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything that they have. Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. And enjoy your hot chocolate.

March 14th, 2013

Parkview has launched the DAISY Awards program at the hospital. The DAISY Award is an international program that rewards and celebrates the extraordinary clinical skills and compassionate care given by nurses every day. Parkview is proud to be a DAISY award partner and will recognize a Parkview nurse with this special honor twice a year. DAISY is an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune SYstem. The DAISY Foundation was established by the family of J. Patrick Barnes, who died of complications of the auto-immune disease Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP) at the age of 33. The family wanted to honor the nurses who helped to ease Pat’s discomfort and who offered him care and compassion.
So, do YOU know of a special nurse who embraces the following criteria:
*Compassionate and empathetic care provider
*Embodies the true meaning of nursing
*Goes above and beyond what is expected of him/her
*Treats his/her patients as if they were family members
*Leads by example; inspires others to care
*Listens to his/her patients with an open heart
Nurses at Parkview and within offices at the hospital, as well as nurses in Brunswick and Topsham who work at Central Maine Healthcare offices will be included in the DAISY program.
If you know a nurse who fits this description, please contact Niki Yeaton, RN, ED Nurse Manager at (207) 373-2383 or by email at nyeaton@parkviewamc.org

October 25th, 2012

THE SAYING ‘THINK GLOBALLY AND ACT LOCALLY IS ALIVE AND WELL
AT PARKVIEW AS THE HOSPITAL HELPED Q 97.9FM SMASH ITS GOAL
OF COLLECTING 500,000 RETURNABLE CANS AND BOTTLES DURING
THIS YEAR’S ‘CANS FOR A CURE’ CAMPAIGN. D-J’S JEFF, LORI AND
MEREDITH WELCOMED THE CREW FROM PARKVIEW, WHO HAULED
MORE THAN 5,000 CANS AND BOTTLES COLLECTED DURING A MONTH
LONG LOCAL ‘CANS FOR A CURE’ FUNDRAISING EFFORT. “THIS WAS
ABSOLUTELY AMAZING,” SAID NIKI YEATON, MANAGER OF PARKVIEW’S
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT. “ONE OF MY STAFF, BECKY, LOST A FRIEND
TO BREAST CANCER NOT LONG AGO AND MENTIONED THE IDEA OF
HELPING THE Q IN THEIR EFFORT TO COLLECT CANS AND BOTTLES TO
RAISE MONEY FOR THE MAINE CANCER FOUNDATION. I MENTIONED IT TO
A COUPLE PEOPLE AT PARKVIEW AND THE IDEA JUST TOOK OFF!”
WEARING PINK TEE SHIRTS WITH “CURE ME” ON THE FRONT AND
“PARKVIEW CANS FOR CURE” ON THE BACK, THE FOUR DROVE DOWN
TO THE MAINE MALL WHERE Q 97.9 HAD BEEN CAMPED OUT ALL WEEK.
ONCE THEY ARRIVED, THE Q CREW INTERVIEWED THE FOUR LIVE ON THE
RADIO. DURING THE INTERVIEW, SUSIE SHARPE, A FORMER PARKVIEW
EMPLOYEE, CALLED TO DONATE $1,000 FROM HER HARPSWELL THEATRE
GROUP WHO WANTED TO DONATE IN HONOR OF THEIR FRIEND WHO
PASSED AWAY FROM BREAST CANCER. “I HEARD MY PARKVIEW FRIENDS
ON THE RADIO AND JUST KNEW I HAD TO HELP OUT THE Q’S CAUSE!”
SHARPE TOLD THE Q. MOMENTS LATER, THE Q CREW ANNOUNCED
THAT THEY HAD SMASHED THEIR GOAL AND THAT PARKVIEW WAS THE
REASON!

September 21st, 2012

August 27th, 2012

The Pastoral Care Office at Parkview Adventist Medical Center is holding a Celebration of Life for Parkview Volunteer Roland Bouchard who passed away last week.

The Celebration is Wednesday, August 29th at 1pm in the Wellness Confrence Room.

August 27th, 2012

It is with great sadness that I share with you the following news:
Roland J. Bouchard, our dear friend and member of the Parkview
family, passed away today at 12:19pm from complications due
to lung cancer.  

Roland wasn’t just our friend, he was a devoted volunteer and expert
grammarian who could challenge the best of us to write better, speak
better and always carry a smile on our faces.  To say that Roland was
one of a kind is an egregious understatement.    No one here at Parkview,
it seems, was exempt from Roland’s expectation for excellence, nor his
unbridled charm.  When there was a need, just about any need for the
service of a volunteer, Roland was the first to show up and often the last
to leave.  His commitment to Parkview, and that includes each and every
individual here at the hospital, was unparalleled.  It can not be overstated
that Roland truly considered Parkview, this hospital, his home filled with
members of his precious family.  He could not walk down the hallways,
any hallway here, without stopping and talking with our staff and employees….
you and me.  He always had a joke or a kind word that he’d share, ALWAYS
with a twinkle in his eye!  

Roland will be sorely missed around here;  but he won’t ever be forgotten.
Three weeks ago we threw Roland a “We Love You, Roland” party, and boy,
did he light up at that!  It was a surprise and I do believe I caught a tear rolling
down Roland’s cheek.  He loved each and every minute of the attention, the
love, the hugs…did I mention the hugs?  Roland was in his glory.  We have
beautiful photos from that party to add to the photo album we gave him.  Many
of you signed a book of memories;  for those who didn’t get the chance, we will
make sure you can when we set up a table out in the hall sometime next week.  

A very special THANK YOU goes out to everyone who helped care for, pray for,
or visit with Roland, particularly the past couple of weeks.  I cannot tell you how important
that was to him.  He absolutely FELT the love.  But, an ENORMOUS
thank you goes out to Bob Murphy…Nurse Bob in the ED.  Like he has been for the
past two years of Roland’s deteriorating health, Bob was with Roland today when
he left this world.  Bob has been an amazing friend.  The ULTIMATE friend to Roland.
So be sure to give Bob a hug or a pat on the back when you see him.  We are indeed
a family here at Parkview and we need to continue to rally behind one another and carry
on in the tradition of the inimitable Roland J. Bouchard:  try our best with a smile on our
faces.

We love you, Roland and hope to see you again!    

Tory Ryden
Director Community Relations/Marketing
Parkview Adventist Medical Center
329 Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine 04011
T: 207.373.2160    F:  207.373.2209

August 16th, 2012

Smooth Sailing Poster 7.2012

July 30th, 2012

Central Maine Bariatric Surgery will present an informational seminar featuring
bariatric surgeons and other members of the bariatric surgery program’s professional
staff. They will provide a general overview of obesity and weight loss surgery options.
The program will include a question and answer session.

Seminar Locations and Times:

Lewiston

12 High Street Medical Office Building at CMMC
Chairman’s Conference Room , Lower Level

First Wednesday or third Monday of each month
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Topsham

Topsham Family Medical Building
4 Horton Place, Conference Room

First Wednesday of each month
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

To Register Please Call (207)795-5710

For More Information Please Visit www.cmmc.org/weightloss

View Flyer

July 27th, 2012

Watch the video below or read the article here: Whooping Cough on the rise in Maine 

The State of Maine, like much of the country, is experiencing a higher than normal rate
of pertussis cases, also known as whooping cough. On Thursday, July 26th, Dr. Larry
Losey, Chief of Pediatrics at Parkview Adventist Medical Center, was interviewed by
WCSH News Reporter Vivien Leigh about the importance of vaccinating children against
Pertussis.

Dr. Larry Losey

Dr. Losey told Leigh the most critical time to vaccinate children is when they are
babies, as their small bodies have difficulty fighting off the illness. Whooping cough is
identified by a trademark cough that grows worse over time and can last 6-10 weeks.
Losey says young babies are susceptible because the cough can be so intense, they may
not be able to catch their breath. Antiobiotics taken early in the illness can lessen the
symptoms.

The majority of cases have occurred in school aged children and teenagers. The upper
respiratory illness is highly contagious. Dr. Losey says anyone taking care of young
children should get a whooping cough booster shot.

Dr. Losey: Named Maine’s “Childhood Immunization Champion” for 2012 by
CDC

In Spring, 2012, the Centers for Disease Control honored 39 Physicians around the
US as “CDC Childhood Inmmunization Champions”. Dr. Losey was the ONLY
Maine Physician to receive this honor. Dr. Losey was cited for his tireless drive and
passion in pushing for lawmakers to ensure that every Maine child will receive full
immunizations.

In the late 1990s, when Maine’s funding for childhood immunization was in jeopardy,
Dr. Larry Losey, Chief of Pediatrics at Parkview Adventist Medical Center in Brunswick,
Maine, drew upon his prior experience working in private health insurance to create
and spearhead a unique funding mechanism to bridge the funding gap so that Maine’s
children could continue to receive recommended vaccines. For seven years, he diligently
led this effort that brought together the private and public sectors. In 2008, Dr. Losey
received the “Director’s Award, Maine Immunization Program” for this and his other
dedicated efforts.

Dr. Losey has also worked to reach and educate more Americans about the importance
of childhood immunization. He has written newspaper articles to promote immunization
nationwide, and he helped launch the “Medical Minutes” radio program, which airs on
several top stations in Portland, ME. Dr. Losey’s segments on childhood immunizations
not only raise awareness among listeners in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, they
also reach immunization-averse populations.

As a result of his dedication to the childhood immunization cause, Dr. Losey was
nominated by the governor to sit on the Maine Vaccine Board, the formation of which

was the first step toward creating a sustainable, universal, childhood immunization
system for the state.

For the extraordinary measures Dr. Losey has taken over 30+ years to ensure that every
child in Maine, from birth to age two, is protected from vaccine-preventable diseases,
CDC is proud to name him a Childhood Immunization Champion.

?
July 18th, 2012

Parkview Classic Golf tournament, sponsored by the Friends of Parkview Adventist Medical Center Auxiliary on Tuesday, July 10th.

Nearly 100 golfers of all levels traversed the rolling 18-hole green, navigating water
hazards, sand traps and ‘forests’ on either side of the green. “What a fantastic day,”
remarked Randee Reynolds, interim President at PAMC. “The spirit here, the energy, it’s palpable. The sun’s out, everyone’s happy. This is a day to remember!!”

And, indeed it was. From the start, when Brunswick Pro A.J. Cavanagh welcomed
golfers and set out the rules for the Scramble, also known as best-ball, in which all
golfers in a foursome all hit from the tee and then from the best successive ‘lie’. WGME
News 13 Anchor Jeff Peterson, for the 5th straight year served as Emcee alongside his
former co-Anchor at WMTW Channel 8 Tory Ryden, who is now Director of Marketing,
Community Relations and Development at Parkview. “Jeff adds a really fun element to
the day! We are so fortunate that he is willing to lend us his talent, his humor and his
caring to Parkview,” Ryden commented. “We played together last year and this year.
We went home with trophies for 3rd place last year. This year? Not so lucky! But we
sure had a blast!”

“I love coming out to this event each year,” Peterson admitted. The weather was perfect,
the people were so friendly and the vegan options at lunch were delicious!” An important
detail for Peterson who became a Vegan in January. In the six months since, he has lost
more than 35 pounds and his bad cholesterol is at an all time low: “lower than when
I was a teenager!” He credits the Parkview program, ‘LifeStyle Choices’, for helping
to transform him. Peterson embraced the Vegan program when he chronicaled it for a
Healthy Life Style series he worked on for the February TV News Sweeps period on
WGME News 13. “Too bad this ‘new’ me didn’t walk off with a 1st place trophy this
year! There’s always next year!” Peterson quipped.

Friends of Parkview Auxiliary President Cheryl Monat reported the 2012 tournament a ‘big success’—on the financial end and the community end. “This event really rallies the Mid Coast community to come together, have fun and support an amazing hospital.
Parkview has been here for more than 53 years, serving the region in a way, a very special way that is unique to Parkview. The spirituality and caring that goes into treating the Parkview patient should be applauded!” Monat said. “The volunteers and Parkview
employees who, year in and year out, give selflessly in pulling off these golf tournaments are the stars. They are the big winners. I wish I could give each of them a 1st place trophy to take home with them!”

Parkview would like to thank all of the sponsors and golfers who turned out to make the
11th Annual Parkview Classic a day to remember!

July 18th, 2012

A FUDGE CONTEST BATTLE TO THE END!

Oh Yummy Fudge, oh yummy fudge
How lovely are you eaten
Oh Yummy Fudge, oh yummy fudge
Oh how you love my taste buds.
You come along and make me smile
You cheer me up when in denial
Oh Yummy Fudge, oh yummy fudge,
How lovely are you eaten.
~ John Henry

AND IS IT NOT TRUE THAT FUDGE IS BETTER EATEN THAN SET ON A SHELF TO BE LOOKED AT?

THE JUDGES OF THE SECOND ANNUAL PARKVIEW FUDGE CONTEST, SPONSORED BY THE FRIENDS OF PARKVIEW AUXILIARY, ALL NODDED IN UNISON WHEN POSED THAT QUESTION. THOSE LUCKY JUDGES: THE VENERABLE VOLUNTEER ROLAND BOUCHARD, EPICURIAN AUXILIARY MEMBER AND VOLUNTEER VICTORIA ROBERTSON, AMIABLE VOLUNTEER ALISHA HAMILTON AND THE EVER EFFERVESCENT PT REHAB GURU KAREN CHAMMINGS.

ALL FOUR ACCEPTED THE CHALLENGE THAT OTHERS WOULD COWER IN FEAR IN A CORNER TO AVOID: TASTE, NIBBLE, DELIGHT IN DELICIOUS FUDGE AND THEN VOTE ON THEIR FAVORITES. NOT AN EASY TASK WHEN THERE WERE 17…THAT’S RIGHT….17 DIFFERENT KINDS OF FUDGE!! “AND EVERY PIECE WAS A DELIGHTFUL MORSEL OF HEAVEN!” ROLAND BOUCHARD WAS OVERHEARD SAYING. SMILES ON ALL FOUR FACES, SEVERAL CLOSED THEIR EYES AS THEY TASTED ONE PIECE AFTER ANOTHER, SIPPING WATER IN BETWEEN TO CLEANSE THE PALATE. AUXILIARY MEMBER AND VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR EXTRAORDINAIRE SUE MARLEY PROVIDED THE LAUGHS AND THE GOOD LUCK CHICKEN APTLY TITLED ‘ME WANT FUDGE’ ON THE SIDELINES TO HELP CHEER THE TASTE TESTERS ALONG. “THAT’S MY FAVORITE, YES, THAT ONE,” VICKI ROBERTSON WHISPERED. THEN, MOMENTS LATER SHE FOLLOWED UP WITH, “NO, THIS ONE. THIS IS DEFINITELY IT!”

THE FUDGE, WHICH VARIED FROM DARK CHOCOLATE TO PEANUT BUTTER TO VANILLA AND CHEESECAKE, WAS LOVINGLY BAKED BY AMBITIOUS PARKVIEW EMPLOYEES. AFTER TASTE TESTING ALL 17 VARIETIES, JUDGES FILLED OUT THEIR OFFICIAL BALLOTS. WHEN VOTES WERE TABULATED, THE JUDGES FACED SUGAR SHOCK (AGAIN) WHEN IT WAS DEEMED THEY’D HAVE TO RETASTE FOR A TIE BREAKER.

THE JUDGES DID WHAT ANY TRUE SOLDIER WOULD DO: THEY BELLIED UP AND FORCED MORE CHOCOLATE DOWN. WE OWE THE FOUR JUDGES A SALUTE AND OUR HEARTY THANKS FOR THEIR SELFLESSNESS IN THE FACE OF FUDGE BATTLE.

TO THE WINNERS, THE SPOILS!! SUE MARLEY, A COSTUME DESIGNER ON THE SIDE, CREATED A LOVELY WINNER’S CROWN FOR THE FIRST PLACE PRIZE AND ADORABLE ITTY BITTY RUNNER UP TROPHIES. COULD THERE REALLY BE A LOSER WHEN IT COMES TO AMAZING FUDGE?

HEREWITH, THE WINNERS OF THE 2ND ANNUAL PARKVIEW FUDGE CONTEST:

Tory Ryden…first place winner….. with her delicious BlueBerry Cheese Cake Fudge

Marsha Penhaker….second place winner…..with her delightful white chocolate peppermint walnut fudge

Gil Michaud and his gang…..third place winner….with his delectable Chocolate Fudge

THE FUDGE THAT THE JUDGES JUST COULDN’T WORK THEIR WAY THROUGH WAS WRAPPED UP AND SOLD IN THE AUXILIARY MAY BASKET SALE. THESE WERE BEAUTIFUL BASKETS MADE BY STUDENTS AT PINE TREE ACADEMY. THIS IS ONE HUNGRY, OR REALLY SMART STAFF! EVERY PIECE OF FUDGE WAS SOLD WITHIN TWO HOURS! $250 WAS RAISED BY THE 2ND ANNUAL PARKVIEW FUDGE SALE AND EVERY PENNY WENT TO THE AMAZING FRIENDS OF PARKVIEW AUXILIARY WHICH HAS PAID FOR ALL OF THE RECENT RENOVATIONS AROUND THE HOSPITAL INCLUDING: THE FRONT LOBBY, THE WAYFINDING SIGN IN THE FRONT OF THE HOSPITAL, THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT WAITING AREA, THE MED SURG/ICU WAITING AREA AND THE CAFETERIA AND OUTDOOR SEATING AREAS. KUDOS TO ALL THAT THEY DO AND KUDOS FOR ALL OF YOU FOR TAKING PART IN THE GREAT FUDGE CONTEST AND SALE! GET THOSE FUDGE RECIPES TOGETHER NOW! WE’LL SEE YOU FOR THE 3RD ANNUAL FUDGE CONTEST AROUND MAY DAY 2013!

June 28th, 2012

Bill McQaid

Bill McQuaid was recently named one of “Forty Under 40″ by Portland Press Herald.

Read the Article Here

June 28th, 2012

Join us on July 10,  2012 at Brunswick Golf Club for our Eleventh Annual Parkview Classic.

Download the Brochure

 

For more information please contact either:

Tory Ryden at (207)373-2160

Email: TRyden@parkviewamc.org

or

Cheryl Monat at (207)353-6182

Email: CCMonat@hotmail.com

January 27th, 2012

“I would like to personally thank Dr. George Cancel and the entire ER staff last night for helping stitch my 13 year olds lip back together.  Dr. Cancel and staff took the time and had the patience to reattach the two parts of his lip flawlessly.  It’s caring and helpful staff that set this apart from other facilities.  Once again thank you Dr. Cancel and ER Staff for another JOB WELL DONE!!!” – Dan posted on Parkview Hospital’s Facebook Wall.

March 28th, 2011

Parkview Adventist Medical Center offers refresher courses in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS).

Brunswick Ambulance

These courses are offered frequently throughout the year and are held at the Topsham Medical Office, 4 Horton Place, Topsham.

You may register for an online BLS certification course atwww.onlineaha.org.

If you opt for the online course, you will need to purchase a key code.  The cost is $17.50 for a key code at www.onlineaha.org, using a credit card.

At www.onlineaha.org, there is a link on the left side of the home page under “Healthcare” for BLS.  You will need to select “BLS for Healthcare Providers Online part 1″ with the product code #80-1055.

The online course is the equivalent of the video that you would watch during a regular course.  After the presentation, you will take a quiz.  If you pass the quiz, you will be prompted to print a certificate of completion.

Please bring this certificate to a Certified AHA instructor for a skills session.

If you have any questions or need help with anything, please call Brandi Tainter at 373.2358 or e-mail:btainter@parkviewamc.org. Select any of the following links to download brochures, schedules and a registration form.

2011 Pediatric Advanced Life Support & Advanced Cardiac Life Support Courses

2011 ACLS Registration Form

2011 PALS Registration Form

All programs are accredited by the American Heart Association and endorsed by Maine EMS.

March 23rd, 2011

Excellence AwardParkview is proud to accept the Maine Tobacco Free Hospital Network Gold Star Standards of Excellence Award for a second year.

“In recognition of agency dedication to excellence in healthcare and tobacco-free living by implementing a 100% tobacco-free policy and providing key community supports to ensure patients, staff and visitors have the access and means to live tobacco-free.”

March 22nd, 2011

One day last August I was enjoying lunch in the cafeteria with several staff members. At one moment I incidentally mentioned that I was feeling a little soreness in my chest. One member quickly and firmly insisted that I report to the Emergency Room to have it checked out. Although it seemed to me that was not necessary, the tone and persistence of the suggestion could not be ignored. In a matter of minutes I was lying on a bed in the E.R. and within the hour the doctor approached me and pointed to the x-ray where a cancer tumor was clearly visible. My reaction at that moment was vague. It was several hours later that I fully comprehended the seriousness of the cancer, and decided to deal with it bravely. The detailed, lengthy, and expansive preparation went forward and on September 29th the surgeon cut in deeply and widely and removed half of my left lung, which shielded the cancer. Healing proceeded miraculously well and several weeks later began the radiation treatments, which distracted me considerably. As we all know the effects of radiation can be discomforting. Almost daily, good folks would ask me how I was feeling and my only response was “exhausted.” I must have uttered the word 100 times per week. Gradually, I began to feel better. During this entire period I was so very fortunate to have dozens of staff members show and express genuine concern for my well being. Here are some examples: several visited me at the hospital and at home; transportation back and forth to Portland, Scarborough, Bath, and to the grocery store was provided without my asking. (It would have been a feast for taxi companies.) The hospital administration sent me a beautiful bouquet of flowers, which uplifted my spirits enormously. At home, I received a multitude of “get well” cards, there were 71 and many contained several signatures. The messages were personal and moving. Finally, I’m not certain I deserved such profound attention. All I can say is that I was deeply stirred by the genuine affection from all which, made my recovery more easily manageable.

I take this space and this moment to immensely thank all of you who joined and hastened my recovery. You have become my Parkview family.

© 2014 Parkview Adventist Medical Center – Hospital in Brunswick, Maine, All Rights Reserved | Main Number: (207) 373-2000